Condolences stream in following death of Rehman Rashid

Condolences and heartfelt sympathies poured in for the family of veteran journalist and author, Rehman Rashid, following news of his death early this morning. Many remembered the 62-year-old for his books, particularly his 30-year-old bestselling social commentary, A Malaysian Journey, and its sequel, Peninsula: A Story of Malaysia. Youth and Sports Minister Khairy Jamaluddin wrote…

The hypocrites in Sarawak Report

These Mat Salleh can shove their outrage up where the sun does not shine. Calling us robbers, konon, when they robbed us and killed so many of us for hundreds of years and now act like they are upright citizens of the world. First pay Hindraf the RM1 million per Indian who were abandoned by…

Journalists drink too much, are bad at managing emotions, and operate at a lower level than average, according to a new study

Journalists’ brains apparently show a lower level of executive functioning, which means a below average ability to regulate their emotions, suppress biases, solve complex problems, switch between tasks, and show creative and flexible thinking. This is according to a new study led by neuroscientist and leadership coach Dr Tara Swart, who selected 40 journalists from…

Sir Harold Evans’ New Book Is a Master Class in How to Write

Sir Harold Evans has had more lives than the luckiest cat. Malcolm Jones writes .. The English-born former editor of The Times of London and The Sunday Times has also served as editor in chief at Random House, founded and edited Conde Nast Traveler, and worked for US News and World Report, The Atlantic Monthly,…

Why United Was Legally Wrong to Deplane David Dao

This article first appeared on the Dorf on Law site. On Sunday, United Airlines passenger David Dao was forcibly removed from his United Airlines flight when he refused to relinquish his seat. The police officers who removed him from the seat, then dragged him down the aisle of the airplane. Videos of the incident show…

Additions to the Five Journalistic “W”s

In journalism, the “Five ‘W’s” are “Who,” “What,” “When,” “Where,” and “Why.” Referring back to the Five “W”s helps journalists address the fundamental questions that every story should be able to answer. Recent events, however, have shown that traditional journalistic practices might not be working as effectively as they used to. As such, here are…